100 Humanitarians Turns Three Years Old

100 Humanitarians Turns Three Years Old

100 Humanitarians Turns Three Years Old

100 Humanitarians Turned 3 years old in July, after making it through the “Terrible Twos!” Not really, we had an amazing year with three full expeditions and a great deal of love and accomplishments. Some highlights:

  • Partnered with Infinite Vision Clothing to host local sew-a-thons
  • Launched the Idaho Chapter of 100 Humanitarians
  • Building 3 Water Storage Systems (3000 liter tanks) in three areas of Kenya that have provided rainwater for families in the areas
  • Donated 5 Water Filters from The Waterbearers organization to provide clean water to families
  • Built 20 garden boxes and 8 garden towers for families in Bomet and Nkareta, Kenya
  • Distributed 1000+ Days for Girls Kits sewn by women in the Zariel and Bomet sewing centers
  • Supported 25 students in school from Kindergarten to Senior year with three graduates and one happening at the end of the year
  • Donated 3 goats, 5 chickens, and a cow to families in Bomet and Ntulele
  • Supported our first post-high school student to go to Teacher’s College
  • Planted 3500 trees
  • Built the Tabby Training Center in Bomet to serve the community with mentoring classes in economic development

So much more than that happened, but how do you explain all of the emotions and feelings and experiences that happen on these expeditions? You don’t, so we invite you to come with us!
Our expeditions are being built out for 2019. There are four opportunities to travel with 100 Humanitarians to Kenya, but these trips are filling up quickly!

February 2019 with Scott and Becky Mackintosh – 2 spots available
June 2019 with Heidi Totten – Currently accepting deposits
October 2019 with Renae Southworth – Creating the Wait List
November 2019 with Heidi Totten – Creating the Wait List

If Kenya is calling, now is the time to let us know what your plans are to join us!

Manifest That!  The Underwear Story

Manifest That! The Underwear Story

Its funny how life is sometimes. You can be going along all hunky dory doing your thing and then you make one small decision and it changes your whole life. I met Heidi Totten in January of 2017 and began to learn all about her trips to Kenya and 100 humanitarians. We were talking one day in September and I was telling her how I like to sew and create my own patterns. She asked if I wanted to go to Kenya- if you’ve met Heidi, you know she does this all the time. I said yes, at some point, but what can I do now?

She asked me if I could make and underwear pattern.

….This is where everything in my life began to change….

I said yes.

An underwear pattern. How often do you think about underwear here in the United States? Maybe once a day, –you know to make sure you put on a clean pair. The point is we rarely think about it, its just part of all the other stuff we don’t really think about here. But that’s not the case in Kenya and other developing countries. There are people- Women and girls who don’t even know what underwear or panties are!

Talk about an eye opener for me. I will never be ungrateful for the things I have ever again.

Heidi told me Christine’s story, and she told me the story of these beautiful girls that missed school every month, had to sit on cardboard for a week and wait while they bled and life went by. These girls that are taught to get a boyfriend, so the boy can get them what they need (feminine hygiene products) to help them stop bleeding and/or sex and then pregnancy. These girls then end up dropping out of school, in early marriages with FGM, prostitution and being young mothers on the streets. For these girls, a pair of underwear is life changing.

Yes, I said yes!

I have sons,There’s like 3 styles of underwear for boys. That’s it 1, 2, 3. Style A,B, or C.

Then you look at girls and it’s like you need freaking library card catalog system just to find ONE style!

Hipster, boy shorts, granny, bikini, skimpy bikini, high cut, low cut, boxer cut, and who knows how many others! But wait there’s more then there’s like hipster style A, B and C…

Anyways musings of a pattern designer.

As I did my research, I started drawing up ideas for the pattern. Every time I finished a drawing I would here a voice in my head that said, “its to much, keep it simple.” I went through several drawings always making them more and more simple, it wasn’t enough. It wasn’t right yet.

One day I was looking at pictures from 100 humanitarians past expeditions. I realized I needed to make this pattern in a way that it would not need anything extra but the fabric and thread.  Did you know most underwear styles here use elastic? I found out later, elastic is hard to find in Kenya.

I made the underwear pattern in eight sizes, with three pattern pieces, no extras. Fabric and thread. Simple.

Heidi and I met up and I gave her the pattern to take to Christine, who would be making underwear from the pattern, in Kenya.

Then she asks, “Can you make this pattern from a T-shirt?”

Yes, yes you can.

One pattern. 8 sizes and you can make it from a T-shirt. Simple.

By small and simple things great things can happen.

-Marissa Waldrop

 

Marissa Waldrop is a wife and Mother to 4 sons. She has always had a passion for creative expression and to inspire others to do their best. Marissa has a Bachelors of Science degree in Communication from Brigham Young Univ. Idaho, over 25 years of experience sewing and creating with fabric and other mediums, and over 5 years of experience as a leader in mentoring and coaching others to embrace creative expression and communication within themselves.

 

Eselenkai Girls Primary Boarding School in Kenya

Eselenkai Girls Primary Boarding School in Kenya

Eselenkai Girls Primary Boarding School in Kenya

On our first expedition to Kenya, 100 Humanitarians held a Days for Girls workshop at Eselenkai Girls Primary Boarding School in Kenya. The girls in attendance were girls who had run from Female Genital Mutilation and early marriage, and were mostly in Class 7 and 8, which is 7th and 8th grades in the U.S. We had become aware of the issue of feminine hygiene for girls, and contacted the school to talk to them about the Days for Girls Enterprise and program that we were helping to create in Kenya. At the time, we were supporting one Days for Girls Enterprise, run by Christine Sakali, a woman that we helped fundraise for the previous year to attend the Days for Girls University in Uganda.

Eselenkai Primary School

After our training with Christine, we met with the girls in a large central hall. Part of the training included not just how to use the reusable feminine hygiene kit, but also hand washing and sanitation. Since then, our workshops have included things like self-defense and how to understand the female cycle. This was a very humbling experience for our team, because until we arrived at the school our expedition had mostly been the fun stuff like The Giraffe Centre and Elephant Orphanage in Nairobi. Realizing what these girls were facing, and how they were so brave to run towards a better life, we couldn’t help but experience a huge range of emotions.

 

 

Days for Girls in KenyaAs we distributed the kits, we had some time to spend with the girls, getting to know them and their stories. Many members of our team had the same names as the girls in the school. The girls, though in a very challenging situation, were all smiles and hugs and LOVED having their pictures taken with us. Each of us had a small group of girls swarming us, asking questions and playing with our hair. There aren’t the same physical boundaries in Kenya as there are in the U.S. and affection and love is everywhere. Even though we were the ones that showed up to serve them, all of us came away feeling like we were the ones who were served and taught by the girls.

Since then, we have made every effort to host a Days for Girls workshop on every expedition. We fundraise in the U.S. for kits, and then have Christine and her team sew the kits in Kenya. Her enterprise is able to then support many families with basic needs and school fees for their children. If you would like to donate to our Days for Girls program, click here.